Grandview Heights was predominantly a logging region, a heritage still evidenced by forests of towering conifers in areas which have not been bulldozed for development. One of the area’s first residents, David Brown, became the postmaster for Hall’s Prairie and lived at the corner of 176th St and 16th Ave. His sons Peter and David were avid tree collectors and donated the land for what is now Redwood Park, singular for its specimen old growth trees.

In 1886 the Royal City Planning Mills purchased the steam locomotive “Old Curly” from the CPR which hauled timber along the railway which was built through Grandview Heights on 168th St (Coast Meridian Road).

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One of the railway’s shacks at the corner of 27th Ave and 184th St became East Kensington School in 1899.



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Kensington Prairie School had already opened at the corner of 168th St and 32nd Ave in a private residence in 1887. This site is now home to the Kensington Prairie Community Centre which was restored to maintain its heritage character. The current structure celebrates its 100th birthday in September 2014.



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Kensington Prairie 1950’s, photo courtest Surrey Archives.



Kensington Prairie 2014 (photo courtesy of City of Surrey)

Kensington Prairie 2014 (photo courtesy of City of Surrey)

Grandview Heights remained a quiet rural area for decades, with agricultural land uses such as grazing pastures, horse farms, and residential acreages.

Here is a 1949 aerial photo of a portion of Grandview Heights between 156th and 168th Streets and 32nd and 20th Avenues, encompassing portions of the current Orchard Grove (NCP 5A), Area 5 (no NCP) and Sunnyside Heights (NCP 2) areas.


Grandview zoom, 1949 photo courtesy Surrey Archives

Grandview zoom, 1949 photo courtesy Surrey Archives

Here is that same quadrant in 2014, displaying great change in some respects, not much in others. You can certainly see Hwy 99 and King George Hwy. in the 1949 photo!


Same area, 2014

Same area, 2014

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During the 1980’s, several acreage residential subdivisions were built such as Country Woods, then Grandview Estates and other enclaves which were added through the 1990’s and 2000’s to this day, although one acre lots are now at such a premium that they are available only by purchasing acreage homes, destroying them and building fresh.


Country Woods

Country Woods

Grandview Heights, like most of South Surrey, maintained this large lot/semi-rural character until 2000 when Morgan Heights NCP 1 became the home to Grandview Corners (including Home Depot and Walmart and soon Superstore) and later Morgan Crossing as well as for the first time in its history, multi-family dwellings, townhouses, and smaller-lot subdivisions. Pacific Heights Elementary School on 26th Ave and 170th St as well as the new Grandview Heights Aquatic Centre are new amenities to service this growing area.


Grandview Heights Aquatic Centre concept

Grandview Heights Aquatic Centre concept

The demographic has changed accordingly as now younger families and singles are buying into the area. Long-time Grandview Heights residents (when they haven’t sold their properties for development) are still here too, committed to see the blending of the traditional semi-rural character with the new more urban tone of the area in an environmentally and humanly sustainable way. This treed and quiet character is, for many new residents, what has drawn them to the area. In the eyes of the GHSA, sustainable new development as well as the protection of the residential acreage areas, the preservation of green space and the creation of forest trails and safe walking paths is positive stewardship for all.

View the Gallery to see the rich spectrum of housing, amenities and natural spaces in Grandview Heights. If you are a member, submit your photos.

To see what is in store for the future, visit the City Planning Documents section of “What is Grandview Heights?” and read the NCP for the area of interest. Also check out the Resources Section of the GHSA website and visit the interactive COSMOS mapping system.

Photo courtesy The Now Newspaper

Photo courtesy The Now Newspaper